Montesquieu

All nations have equally agreed on stig­ma­ti­zing the inconti­nence of women : that is because nature has spo­ken to all nations. She ins­ti­tu­ted defense, she ins­ti­tu­ted attack ; and having put desi­res on both sides, she pla­ced bold­ness on one side, and shame on the other ; she has given to indi­vi­duals long stret­ches of time for their own pre­ser­va­tion, and only moments for their per­pe­tua­tion.

It is the­re­fore untrue that inconti­nence fol­lows the laws of nature ; on the contrary, it vio­la­tes them. It is modesty and reserve that fol­low those laws.

It is moreo­ver in the nature of intel­li­gent beings to be aware of their imper­fec­tions ; nature has the­re­fore put shy­ness in us, in other words shame for our imper­fec­tions.

Thus, when the phy­si­cal power of cer­tain cli­ma­tes vio­la­tes the natu­ral law of the two sexes and of intel­li­gent beings, it is up to the legis­la­tor to make civil laws that force the nature of the cli­mate and re-esta­blish the ori­gi­nal laws.